Don’t Worry Cvs Has Hundreds of Items You Need

I found this sign at the local CVS store and found it to be absolutely ridiculous. First of all, it claims that there are hundreds of items within the store that you NEED. And secondly, that the advertising made it appear that CVS was doing a public service by cutting the prices of life’s necessities. This sign coincides well with Marx’s concept of the all-powerful Capitalist society. Marx argues that the economy is the basis of all of society, and everything else, including religion, art, ideas, culture, and the state are the mere superstructure. Therefore, the economy rules everything within society, meaning that those who own the means of production hold all of the power. In this case, the CEO of CVS holds power over the shoppers and utilizes advertising such as this to inspire the shoppers to buy more and more to further buffer his wealth.

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Is Big What we Really Want

Like my last post, I found this commercial doing one of my favorite things to do when I am avoiding work, which is catching up on tv shows on Hulu. Most of the time, the ads I see are commercials I have seen a million times or are painfully boring, but this time something was different. I thought that this was actually really clever and just as the Smart Car sticks out for going against our inclination for ‘BIG’ the commercial stood out from all of the other monotonous ones that I normally tune out. I think that this commercial is a perfect example of American consumerism, which has been especially on my mind since it was the focus of my group project. Once again I will pull from Marcuse to show how the idea of ‘big’ in the add is an example of a false need. This is because it has been programmed into our minds to go for the bigger and “better” thing, when really we need much less. The Frankfurt School also drives home this theory by bringing in capitalism, which drives people to keep buying so that it can thrive.

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