The Blurring of The 8220;i” And 8220;me”

In this scene of the 1997 film Liar Liar, Jim Carrey’s character is forced to go before the executive board of the law firm he works for and give his honest opinion of his superior. The whole premise of the movie is that due to his son’s birthday wish, Carrey cannot tell a lie. This includes the seemingly innocent white lies that people tell on a daily basis. As a result of this, Carrey bares his sincere and painfully honest opinions of everyone in the boardroom. These opinions are obviously offensive and the whole time Carrey wishes he could lie about how he actually feels.

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Truck Nuts

This is a car that I took a picture of in front of Starbucks. Before this year I have never seen this before. There are so many things we can say about this phenomenon. For those of you that don’t know, there is a trend out there of people, mostly men I image, putting these plastic “balls” on the back of their trucks. Honestly, this trend seems a little ridiculous to me, why would anyone want to portray themselves as a douche-bag? After I thought about it for a minute the first concept that came to my mind was the idea of dramaturgy. If the whole worlds a stage, and everything we do is in anticipation of others, what does this say about the driver of this awful truck? The driver presents this image to every driver that follows behind him which is also another sexual metaphor. That fact that men put these balls on trucks just furthers to instill the idea that large, strong things are masculine and should have a ball sack. This also screams Mead’s “me” because who is this for but other people? Only other drivers can see these balls, not ever the owner of them.

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The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers a Sociological Study The Trenchcoat Mafia’s Project on Cartoons And Social Theory

The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers television show was one of the most popular children’s television shows during the 90’s. From a sociological perspective, the show’s settting, its characters, and their interactions are the epitome of the society that Goffman refers to in his book The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life.  The Power Rangers themselves embody what Goffman refers to as a “team” in which the members are defined as “being in the know” and together work to  put on a front or performance for their audiences. For example, the rangers (along wth Zordon and Alpha 5) are the only individuals in the town of Angel Grove who know the identity of the Power Rangers. When crisis situations arrive and the town is in danger, the team members must put on the performance that they are ignorant to the identity and wherabouts of the Power Rangers. When the members of the team are outside the earshot or visibility of an audience, or in the “backstage” region, they use the time to either contact Zordon for orders, discuss Power Ranger matters (staging issues), or morph into the Power Rangers (showtime!).

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